How to Fit a Climbing Helmet for Optimal Protection

No matter if you’re on the crag, assessing your next move, or belaying to the ground, rockfall is a risk of climbing and one that you should be ready for with a helmet. A climbing helmet also shields your head in the event you fall. Even if you’re sure, you’ve got the person who is climbing with you for your life, falling into the wall of rock is less frightening in the event that your head is cushioned.

As with all climbing equipment, the fit of the helmet is completely individual. What is comfortable for your friends or family members shouldn’t necessarily suit you. Make sure you take a head measurement because this can serve as an idea of the right size. 

Types of Climbing Helmets: Which One is Right for You?

There are two types of climbing helmets that you can pick from, and each has pros and cons based on the priorities you place:

The hardshell helmets have a solid outer shell that has an extremely tiny layer of foam inside. They’re typically more durable and cost less. 

Foam headgear is made with an extremely thick layer of foam. They are extremely lightweight and breathable but are not as durable and costlier. 

As you will see, if you’re trying to save money and searching for a product that will perform effectively and lasts for a long time, then hard shells for helmets are the best way to choose. If comfort is the primary priority and you’ll climb in scorching temperatures, it might be wise to spend a bit more for a foam-filled helmet. The type of helmet you choose can provide the protection you need against falling and falls on rocks.

Also Read: Camping Terms Everyone Should Know Before Venturing Out

Is your bike helmet suitable for rock climbing, too?

This is a very popular question as nearly everyone has a helmet for their bike. Your helmet for biking won’t offer adequate protection against rock climbing as well. In the first place, it is fitted with vents that allow airflow when you’re pedalling as well as allow tiny rock particles to pass through – this could slow down the crumbling of smaller rocks, but you’d end up having the helmet stuffed with dirt, which isn’t optimal.

Additionally, bike helmets are uniquely legible for cycling hazards and are made to absorb and disperse the results from going over the handlebars and falling on the front and back of the head. In a bad crash, your bike helmet will lose its original integrity and no longer protect you. 

Is your bike helmet suitable for rock climbing, too?

Find the Right Size Climbing Helmet for You

Now that we’ve confirmed that you indeed require a climbing helmet to climb and descending, how do you decide which size to purchase? A good alternative is to visit your local gear shop for professional advice and try helmets, however, if purchasing from the internet, you must choose the correct size to ensure your safety because safety equipment such as helmets aren’t able to be sold again after they’ve been returned and purchased.

If you’re looking for a climbing helmet, you’ll find that they typically are available in two sizes, usually M/L and S/M. This is because climbing helmets can be adjusted therefore, each size covers a different head circumference. Each brand is different, and the smaller size usually accommodates heads with a circumference between 19in to 22in (48cm between 55 and 59cm), and the larger size can be used for heads that measure around 22in to 25 inches (55cm between 63.5cm). There’s always a little similarity for those somewhere in between.

To measure your head circumference, get a thick measuring tape and wrap it around your head, just above your ears, and approximately an inch above your eyebrows. If necessary, try on a helmet by adding it into 3D.

How much should you tighten your climbing helmet?

After you’ve determined the size of helmet for climbing you need, then it’s time to adjust the fit of your helmet to provide maximum comfort and protection. The most important thing for your headgear needs to be snug but not too tight or restricting – much like the climbing boots in reality. And it shouldn’t be loose.

How to Fit a Climbing Helmet for Optimal Protection

To adjust the height of your climbing helmet, begin by moving the adjustment dial at the back of the helmet and then put it on top of your head without tightening the chin strap. It’ll sit higher than your ski or bike helmet. Don’t be concerned because this is how it’s supposed to feel and look.

Follow these steps:

  • Begin to adjust the dial until it fits snugly on your head.
  • Before fastening the chin strap Move your head side to side and up and down, as you would do on the rock. The helmet should remain in place, even with the chin strap fastened.
  • When you’re sure that the helmet will not move, however, it’s not so tight that it causes you to get headaches, attach the chin strap, and make sure it is comfortable and snugly underneath your chin. The straps that go to the opposite side of your ears must be in a straight line with the skin.

Now you’re now ready to transmit it!

How to Fit a Climbing Helmet for Optimal Protection

Conclusion

In the end, it is essential to wear an appropriate climbing helmet to ensure optimal protection. Make sure that you alter the straps as well as sizing bands to ensure that the helmet sits comfortably on your face. Be sure that the front lip that is on the headgear is aligned with your eyebrows and that your chin straps are snug enough to hold the helmet in position. If you have a well-fitting climbing helmet, you’ll be sure that you’re protected when climbing. 


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John Jeffries
By John Jeffries

I am John Jeffries, and I love writing about camping and tourist destinations. I'm a bit of an expert on the subject, as I've been camping and hiking all over the country. I also enjoy writing about lesser-known tourist destinations; my goal is to help people find new and exciting places to visit. When I'm not writing, I can usually explore new places or spend time with my family.



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